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  • Open Access

Human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein N polymorphisms among renal transplant recipients in India

  • 1, 4Email author,
  • 1,
  • 1,
  • 2,
  • 3,
  • 1 and
  • 5, 6
BMC Infectious Diseases201414 (Suppl 3) :P66

https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-14-S3-P66

  • Published:

Keywords

  • Renal Transplant Recipient
  • Gene Primer
  • Envelope Glycoprotein
  • Human Cytomegalovirus
  • Indian Council

Background

Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is one of the most common infectious complications in renal transplant recipients. Extensive genetic polymorphisms in envelope glycoproteins of HCMV have been demonstrated among clinical HCMV isolates. Some previous studies have proposed the potential linkage between HCMV gN genotype to the frequency of symptomatic infection and clinical outcome in renal transplant recipients. No data available on circulating HCMV strains among renal transplant recipients in India.

Objective

To determine the cytomegalovirus strain diversity in renal transplant recipients.

Methods

One hundred thirty two renal transplant recipients were included in this study. DNA extracted from blood samples by Qiagen kit method. Specimen DNA was amplified by PCR using glycoprotein N (gN) gene primers. Genotyping was carried out by RFLP and results were confirmed by direct and/or cloning followed by nucleotide sequencing of the plasmid DNA of selected strains.

Results

HCMV detected by PCR for gN gene in the 83(63%) samples and sixty seven of these samples were typed by RFLP. Among these gN1 was identified in 17(25.3 %) cases. None of the samples contained gN2 genotype, gN3 genotype detected in 9(13.4%) cases, while gN4 strain was identified in 23 cases (34.3%), respectively. Infection with multiple gN type was seen in 18(27 %) of the samples.

Conclusion

The results of our study showed that gN4 was the commonest gN genotype found followed by gN1. This study was supported by the Indian Council of Medical Research, Government of India.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Departments of Microbiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
(2)
Departments of Nephrology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
(3)
Departments of Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
(4)
Department of Microbiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, India
(5)
Departments of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, USA
(6)
Departments of Microbiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, USA

Copyright

© Patro et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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