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  • Open Access

Clinico epidemiological profile of HIV - TB coinfection among PLHIV in coastal south India

  • 1
BMC Infectious Diseases201414 (Suppl 2) :P32

https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-14-S2-P32

  • Published:

Keywords

  • Tuberculosis
  • Prevention Programme
  • Public Health Problem
  • Opportunistic Infection
  • Major Public Health Problem

Background

Tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection diagnosed in HIV positive patients in India. HIV and Tuberculosis co-infection is a major public health problem as well as a leading cause of death in developing countries.

Aims

To study the trends and clinico epidemiological profile of HIV and tuberculosis co-infection from January 2008 to December 2011.

Method

A hospital based retrospective study was conducted on all subjects having HIV and Tuberculosis co-infection from January 2008 to December 2011. Data was collected using semi-structured proforma from Integrated Counselling and Testing Center (ICTC) records. All analysis was done using SPSS version 11.5. Statistical test Chi-square was done.

Results

In 2011, 17.3% HIV positive cases were co-infected with tuberculosis in comparison to 6.5% in 2008, 14.9% in 2009 and 8.5% in 2010. HIV and Tuberculosis co-infection was more prevalent in males (69.3%) than in females (30.7%) and 90.9% of the study subjects were married. Most of the co-infected cases (89.8%) were on anti-tubercular treatment.

Conclusion

HIV and Tuberculosis co-infection is under-diagnosed and under-treated. Thus there is a need to integrate Tuberculosis and HIV prevention programmes to face the threat of HIV associated tuberculosis.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Mangalore, India

Copyright

© Bhaskaran; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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